Adoption in the United States a Reference for Families, Professionals, and Students

May 29th, 2008
Categories: Book Reviews, Resources

Adoption in the United States, A Reference for Families, Professionals, and Students is a new book just released in May by Lyceum Books Incorporated. If you are new to the world of adoption, reading this book could save you hundreds of research hours. It could also save you from making embarrassing blunders when dealing with birth families, adoptive families, or adoption professionals. Those of us who have been part of the adoption world for over a decade have had to learn the ropes by asking many questions and making mistakes. If you are thinking about adopting, just started the process, or finalizing your first adoption this book could be invaluable to you. Adoption in the United States would also be valuable to a student at college… [more]

Should Your Family Socialize With Other Adoptive Families

April 11th, 2008

Should your family socialize with other adoptive families? What benefits are there to socializing with other adoptive families? Does your area have organized events specifically for adoptive families? If not, have you thought about organizing a support group or an event? Maybe you have never considered any of these questions. Because our adoption journey began through providing foster care to area children, attending social events for adoptive families seemed very natural. In the process of becoming licensed foster parents we were required to attend many hours of training and then to maintain training hours each year. We enjoyed attending these trainings and getting to know other foster and adoptive families. We are very fortunate because our city has a foster adoptive family resource center that organizes… [more]

Does the Adoption Tax Credit Apply to Self-Employment Tax?

April 7th, 2008

A reader recently posted a question on one of my blogs as a comment. She asked me if the adoption tax credit could help to eliminate a person’s self-employment tax. This reader was understandably confused when she was told that the adoption tax credit did not apply to the self-employment tax. Surprisingly, I can answer this question. In my previous life, before adoption, I was an accountant. In addition, Super Dad and I completed two adoptions in 2007 and I earned money from self-employment (blogging) in 2007. Therefore, our tax return may be very similar to this reader’s tax return. The maximum tax credit that can be taken for each adoption in 2007 is $11,390. However, the credit is not a refundable credit. This means that… [more]

Power of Books in Understanding Adoption

November 8th, 2007
Categories: Resources

I love to read almost as much as I love to write. Books are my constant companion, and I learn so much through them. I have found that the same holds true for children: They can learn so much through reading a book. Reading books about adoption is a great way for children to understand the difficult concepts involved in adoption in an age-appropriate and non-threatening manner.

My favorite book about adoption is Jamie Lee Curtis' Tell Me Again About the Night I was Born. My only complaint is that I cry every time I read it to my son because it captures everything that I ever wanted to tell him. The pictures appeal to young children, and the book explains everything that we went through… [more]

Parenting Resources – Adoptive Families Magazine

August 1st, 2007
Categories: Resources

When looking for parenting advice and resources, it is often difficult to find articles and information that address the specific concerns of adoptive parents. While there are often articles about how to adopt in more mainstream parenting magazines, they seldom speak to the specific issues and concerns that parents face while raising adopted children. A terrific resource our family found early on has been Adoptive Families Magazine. We actually located this helpful magazine in 1985 before we adopted our first child, and have been subscribers ever since. In the beginning the information and resources geared toward finding the best way for our family to approach adoption were just what we needed. The many articles about what to expect, and pieces about other… [more]

Books can heal.

November 15th, 2006
Categories: Resources

Many of the bloggers on www.adoptionblogs.com have written some form of commentary about Ann Fessler's book The Girls Who Went Away. I have not read it yet. I wrote a post many moons ago stating that I would read it once I worked up the courage to do so. Clearly, from the comments of some of those who have read it it is quite a powerful read about the heartbreaking experiences of young women and girls who relinquished children to adoption in the late 1960's. From what I have been able to determine from others' accounts, Fessler shares the stories of many women who were coerced by many different forces (social, familial, personal)into relinquishing their children for adoption. The book brings a perspective… [more]

The Wide World of Adoption Blogging

August 17th, 2006
Categories: Resources

As bloggers we are a very fortunate lot here at www.adoptionblogs.com. We have a large and well known venue to blog from and we can be easily found. We can read about a wide array of adoption topics, express our opinions on one another's blogs, take a cue from someone else's writing, all just by showing up on the site to see what folks are writing about. However, there are tons of adoption blogs in the blogosphere that are easily overlooked because they lack the platform that we enjoy. Still, their authors write faithfully and chronicle their adoption experiences honestly in ways both humorous and poignant. I've mentioned before that I personally enjoy Gotcha Baby for its variety and its… [more]

Child Welfare Information Gateway

August 14th, 2006
Categories: Resources

Knowledge is power and information is power. So information that actually makes one more knowledgeable should be a double bonus. Here is a link to a pretty snazzy site that I believe will fit the bill. It is full of resources on all things child welfare related from abuse and neglect, to foster care, to adoption. The information is straightforward and easily understood, clearly written with the end use consumer (most likely a layperson) in mind. I have written before that one can become easily overhwlmed by the information that is available on the internet about adoption. However, this Child Welfare Information Gateway site seems to offer information in manageable chunks that can be easily processed. There is a National Adoption Directory that according to the site, "Includes State-by-State contact… [more]

Adoption Talk Radio. Now Why Didn’t I Think of That?

March 1st, 2006
Categories: Resources

While surfing the internet on the desperate hunt for useful resources for my readers I came upon this site. Ta-da! I felt as if I had struck gold. There is so much information out there on the web, and in bookstores, and in the libraries. Most of it is useful, some of it less so. But, this particular site is an internet talk radio show just on...adoption! How neat is that? In case you haven't noticed, I'm not the most technologically savy person in the world. So, if the entire adoption world is already familiar with this site except for me, just have pity on me and allow me to enjoy my "discovery." The thought of that reminds me of the times one… [more]

Blog Envy

February 24th, 2006
Categories: Resources

I have blog envy. I didn't even know such a thing existed, until I started following all of the exceptional writing here at AdoptionBlogs. I've discovered that my particular blog style is very linear, and some would say, concrete. I think it. I write it. I post it. But, I am challenging myself to grow and stretch. I have been practicing how to use new and different features over on my parenting blog and now I'm ready to try to fly my wings here. I still have a long way to go though to "run with the big dawgs" like Nancy, Bill, Moose and all the others who make me absolutely green with envy. Ha. But, I'll figure it out. Who knows, I might even learn how to add… [more]